• Tue. May 18th, 2021

Dimancherouge

Technology

Body camera pilot project launches Oct. 1: St. Thomas police – London

St. Thomas police say a body camera pilot project announced earlier this year, will get underway Oct. 1.

The project is in partnership with Axon and its subsidiary Axon Public Safety Canada, Inc., which the service already works with as Axon currently provides the service’s Taser conducted energy devices.

The pilot will last 120 days, ending in January 2021, and will involve a total of 12 cameras with six cameras deployed per shift to officers on community patrol. The other six will recharge and have their data downloaded and the cameras will be rotated each shift.

Read more:
Police body cameras in Canada — How common are they and do they reduce excessive force?

The service notes that not every officer on shift will be equipped with a body camera and so not every interaction with the public will be recorded.

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“The St. Thomas Police Services Board supports building public trust, community support and enhancing officer safety and public safety,” said police board chair Dave Warden.

“This is an example of our clear commitment to ensuring we have an accountable police service to those who they serve.”

Chief Chris Herridge believes the cameras will serve to strengthen relations between police and the community.

Read more:
Toronto police officers begin wearing body cameras as start of year-long rollout

“Body worn cameras will undoubtedly assist with improving the high-quality public service expected of police officers and enhance police accountability while at the same time increasing public trust,” he said.

“We have come so far in developing and strengthening relationships with our community, and in my opinion, body worn cameras will only boost our ability to improve the overall well-being of St. Thomas.”

Body-worn cameras have received a mixed reaction as advocates suggest the cameras would help to “enhance” trust in law enforcement and could deter bad behaviour, while critics point to studies that suggest very little impact on police use of force and say the cameras serve as an investment “in a system that’s violent and racist.”


Click to play video 'Police body-cam video appears to show sheriff’s deputy shoving Masai Ujiri after Raptors NBA Finals win'



Police body-cam video appears to show sheriff’s deputy shoving Masai Ujiri after Raptors NBA Finals win


Police body-cam video appears to show sheriff’s deputy shoving Masai Ujiri after Raptors NBA Finals win

— with files from Global News’

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